How To Lower Blood Pressure (4 Week High Blood Pressure Diet Plan)

How To Lower Blood Pressure (4 Week High Blood Pressure Diet Plan) 1

Blood Pressure Nutrition – Drop pounds and greatly reduce your blood pressure in 30 days.

Blood Pressure: What Is It?

Before we look at high blood pressure and how to treat it naturally, let’s just talk about what blood pressure is…

Simply put, blood pressure is the measure of the pressure that your blood puts on your artery walls, as your heart beats.

Don’t think too much about it, but blood pressure is measured both when your heart beats and in between the beats. 

This is why when you get your blood pressure measured the reading has 2 numbers. Blood pressure is written or spoken like a fraction: 120/80, or ‘120 over 80.’ 

Often times this reading can be confusing, because when you ask what the numbers mean you are told the top number is systolic and the bottom number is diastolic, and you probably don’t know what those words are.

Don’t worry…I’m going to explain it.

The top or first number is the systolic reading, and the bottom or second number is the diastolic reading.

Often when the medical terms systolic and diastolic are use, people get confused, but there is no need to be.

But you are probably thinking…what is systolic and diastolic?

And that’s easy for to explain.

Systolic is the measure of the pressure on the artery walls, when your heart beats.

Diastolic is the measure of the pressure on the artery walls in between heart beats. Typically, health care providers are more concerned with the first number and maintaining it in a healthy range, as higher systolic readings are linked to the risk of cardiovascular disease. And this is why…

When your heart beats, blood that is in the heart is pushed out. What that means is that the heart applies pressure above 120, then not only is there increased pressure put on your arteries, but that your heart is exerting unnecessary energy. This increased pressure over time takes a serious toll on your heart and arteries.

What do the numbers mean?

It’s important to know what the numbers mean. When you are told your blood pressure, you’ll know that each number represents pressure…

…when your heart beats…

…and…

…in between your beats…

But you may ask, how much pressure?

Is it measured in pounds, kilos, or ounces?

The answer is NO.

Blood pressure is measured in metric, by millimeters of mercury, also known as mmHG, as this is a very precise and specific measurement.  

In order to measure your blood pressure, healthcare professionals use a blood pressure cuff and a stethoscope. 

While the cuff applies a consistent pressure outside of your body, it allows the cuff to record the internal pressure of your blood in your arteries. 

The cuff and the stethoscope is used to determine the pressure of your blood on your artery walls, when your heart beats…and, you guessed it… in between your heart beats.

What is Normal and What is High? 

So now that we know, what blood pressure is, let’s talk about normal and high blood pressure.

Normal blood pressure should be at or below 120/80 in healthy adults. Blood pressure readings above this, pose a threat to your long term health and can be a red flag for environmental and health concerns. This is why it’s important to have your blood pressure checked regularly.

While less than 120/80 is considered normal, higher ratings have different meanings, let’s look at what they are…

Don’t let these ranges scare you, maybe you had a reading and you high blood pressure, but a single reading doesn’t mean that you are at risk. It’s normal as we age for our blood pressure to increase slightly, due to plaque buildup and increased stiffness of arteries.

In most people, systolic blood pressure rises steadily with age due to increasing stiffness of large arteries, long-term build-up of plaque, and increased incidence of cardiac and vascular disease. 

A slightly increased blood pressure when you are overall healthy is ok and a normal part of the aging process.

You need to worry when… your blood pressure is regularly and consistently higher than normal, you have to pay attention and make changes to your lifestyle. 

But you have to know, that even small changes, implemented consistently overtime can have dramatic results in lowering your blood pressure, but before we talk about that, let’s talk about why your blood pressure changes.

Why Does My Blood Pressure Change?

Blood pressure changes throughout the day and throughout your lifetime, and can do so, for many different reasons…

Stress

Alcohol

Caffeine

Tobacco

Being overweight or obese

Not enough exercise

High Salt Diet

Older Age

Genetics & Family History of High Blood Pressure

So you can see, there are many different things that can affect your blood pressure. Some…you can control, like stress, weight, diet, alcohol, caffeine & tobacco use and exercise…some you can’t control, like age and genetics.

What this tells us, is that you have more control over your blood pressure, than you probably thought, and the variables that you can control, can make a big difference in your blood pressure and overall health. If have a relatively normal blood pressure, don’t take it for granted because as you age, it will increase. You can easily make lifestyle changes to prevent high blood pressure, just like you can make changes to lower your blood pressure to a normal healthy range.

Why Do I Have High Pressure?

So if you have been diagnosed with high blood pressure, you are bound to be asking yourself, why me?

It’s a good question to ask…and, you are going to learn a lot about yourself by answering this question.

We already talked about the contributing factors that lead to high blood pressure, and instead of listing them again, let’s look at why you have high blood pressure from a relatable way…

You are an adult and probably have many roles and responsibilities. Maybe you find yourself juggling all of the different relationships, commitments and responsibilities that come from having a job, raising a family, being a friend and living in a community…if so…You’ve got stress.

Because you are so busy, you might not eat the healthiest diet or exercise regularly. And if you’ve fallen into the trap of eating processed convenience foods that are high in sodium and calories, now you get to add…

You are overweight or obese

You don’t get enough exercise

You eat a High Salt/Calorie Diet

Maybe to get going in the morning you drink lots of coffee or beverages loaded with caffeine, to relax you drink more than 1-2 alcoholic drinks per day every day, and maybe you have even developed a smoking habit, which means that you now:

Consume too much alcohol, caffeine and tobacco.

If any of this sounds familiar, don’t worry, you are not alone.

Adulthood is hard and challenging, however you can begin to make small simple changes to take back control of your life, lower your blood pressure and lose weight. 

You’ve Got High Blood Pressure: Now What?

Take a deep breath.

Finding out that you have a health problem, can be scary and make you feel uncertain. But you need to know, that with some change, your situation will improve and you can lower your blood pressure.

Take another deep breath…

…you know what? Take as many breaths as you need, and when you feel calm and focused, read on…

Deending on your situation, your Dr. might write you a stack of prescriptions, but make no mistake, while prescription medication can control your out of control blood pressure, you are the only one who can cure it.

Prescription medication will not address the lifestyle choices you make, nor will they shrink your waistline and make your life healthier and happier.

Many times the changes we need to make can add to our already busy and hectic lives. Remember the first contributing factor to high blood pressure? Stress…Don’t let the knowledge that you have high blood pressure, or that idea of making changes add to your stress…

Very simply, we are going to address the changes that you need to make to lower your blood pressure. 

Are they going to be easy? Let’s be honest…No, they aren’t…Change is never easy.

But one thing that your high blood pressure is telling you, is that what you are doing now isn’t easy and it’s also harmful to your health. 

It’s time to put yourself first, to take the time you need to make sure you are the healthiest that you can be. There’s nothing to wait for, let’s get started.

The Stress and High Blood Pressure Relationship: It’s Complicated

Stress…the word alone, can create stress.

Life offers many stressful situations and experiences. And while stress in and of itself can cause spikes in your blood pressure temporarily, it doesn’t necessarily lead to long term high blood pressure.

When you experience stress, your body produces cortisol, a stress hormone that triggers the flight or fight response. The flight or fight response increase your blood pressure temporarily by causing your heart to beat faster and your blood vessels to narrow. 

Think about how often this happens to you daily…but after a short time, your body calms and the cortisol leaves your system…but your thoughts and emotions, are not as easy to come back to a sense of calm. And this is where the relationship of stress and high blood pressure become complicated.

Research indicates that it’s how we deal with stress that creates long term high blood pressure…that’s why it’s complicated.

When we experience stress, our bodies not only go haywire with stress hormones, we also often forget that we need to learn coping skills and deal with the causes of stress, however…

…confronting stress…

…is stressful… so we can fall into the trap of avoiding what is causing stress and develop unhealthy patterns.

It goes something like this…Let’s say we have a relationship with someone who compromises our boundaries, it takes effort and time to have a conversation with that person to resolve the conflict. A conversation, that may be awkward and uncomfortable. Often it appears easier to avoid the confrontation or the person, except that rarely works. 

Because your emotions and thoughts are still agitated, you may turn to eating comfort food, having a drink to relax or using tobacco. You may stay awake at night thinking about the situation, only to wake up and drink lots of caffeine, which gets you going but doesn’t give you energy to exercise…

And right there, you’ve fallen into the trap of adding the top factors that contribute to high blood pressure into your life.

In order to sort out this complicated relationship, you have to notice how you deal with stress, so you can avoid creating more stress and unhealthy behaviors that contribute to your high blood pressure.

The Weight and Blood Pressure Relationship: It’s Not Complicated

Your body weight has a direct effect on your blood pressure, as much because extra weight makes all body functions harder, as the lifestyle choices that go along with extra weight or obesity. 

When you are overweight, your blood pressure not only goes up and puts additional strain on your heart, you are also at greater risk of developing other health problems.

Excess weight can be measured by the relation of your height and weight, and is known as your Body Mass Index, or BMI for short. 

Knowing your BMI can give you a good starting point for figuring out how your body weight is contributing to your high blood pressure, especially when you know that a BMI between 18-5 and 25 is considered ideal, while a BMI of 25 to 30 is considered overweight and a BMI over 30 is considered obese. 

So now that you know your BMI, don’t get depressed, almost everyone struggles with their weight…hardly anyone is happy with their BMI…

..but there is good news…Losing weight can reduce your blood pressure and improve your overall health.

Now, before you go out and start a crash diet, understand, that a crash diet, is NOT going to work…sure…you might lose a few pounds…but a crash diet, won’t improve your overall health or lower your blood pressure the same way that LIFESTYLE changes will. 

Simply by changing your routine and adding a few things here and there, you are going to lose weight and make a lot of health gains, including lowering your blood pressure.

Fun FACT: Losing as few as 5 to 10 pounds will lower your blood pressure.

The goal of this book is to get you started on the path to your optimal BMI, it won’t happen overnight, there is no magic, there is only small changes that have a snowball effect on your weight, your blood pressure and your life.

What that means, is that you have to set small realistic goals to get to your optimal BMI, and realize that it takes time. By the end of this 30-day plan, you will achieve sufficient weight loss and have adopted healthier lifestyle choices that will set you up for your future success.

30 Days to a Smaller Waist and Lower Blood Pressure – How To

There’s nothing like being told you have a health problem, to set you off in a frenzy to feel better and improve your health, and being told you have high blood pressure is no exception.

It can be overwhelming.

So the best advice, is not to do it.

You are going to be doing a lot of work in the 30 days, and the last thing you need to do is waste your time or energy on things that don’t work. The best thing about treating your high blood pressure naturally is that it doesn’t require a lot of expensive things like treatments or medicines.

You can treat your blood pressure naturally…by taking things away. Things like…

Stress

Alcohol

Tobacco

Processed Foods

…and you’ll be left with…

Lower blood pressure, more time, more peace of mind, more money and a smaller waistline. That’s what is called a win-win.

Stress Management: Stop Overcommitting

So remember when we talked about being an adult, about how fun it is…to have commitments and responsibilities…

One of the biggest keys to managing high blood pressure and weight, is managing stress.

Start thinking of something stressful and you’ll feel the tension creep into your body. And you may start thinking about the unhealthy ways that you want to use to avoid stress…don’t do it. Try something new.

Managing stress is important. It takes courage and determination, not to let situations or other people’s actions stress us out. We are going to start with some basic strategies on how to deal with and cope with stress, lets’ start with the big picture and work our way towards dealing with people and situations.

Time Management

Probably the biggest part of stress management is time management.

You have to have the time to manage stress, right?

And there are only so many hours in the day…and there probably aren’t too many days that most of your time isn’t accounted for…

Do this, get a piece of paper, and write down what you do each day, and how long it takes, include how many hours a day you sleep.

Then add up all the times. Chances are good you’ll end up close to or over 24 hours. 

Next write down your daily schedule…include sleep, work, family time, errands and activities.

Now comes the hard part…Start seeing where you can cut back on your commitments, don’t include work, sleep and family time, but make sure to reduce or eliminate the things that make you feel stressed, you know what they are, so there’s no point listing them here.

See how you can make your schedule simpler…offer to carpool kids to school or activities with another parent and rotate days…

…what errands do you really to run? Can you shop or do banking online…

…do you really need to bake those cookies for the bake sale, or can you just buy some…

Are you starting to get the idea?

When you aren’t running in 6 different directions at once, you can reduce stress and set yourself up for success.

Let’s look at other ways you can manage your time, it’s probably the simplest concept, but can be the hardest to do…

Just Say No…say it again…Just Say No

You probably already know the types of things you need to say no to…

…the endless volunteering at the kids schools or sporting events…

…the friend/neighbor/relative who only calls you every time they need you to something for them…

You have to look at defining and maintaining your boundaries and limits differently when you have high blood pressure. Saying no isn’t about not wanting to help out, it’s about taking care of your health. Having high blood pressure is a way to redefine your priorities in a way that works for you. So you are going to have to practice, practice, practice: no, no, no, no.

Just Say NO: Processed Foods and Sodium, Alcohol, Caffeine & Tobacco

Processed Foods & Sodium, Alcohol, Caffeine & Tobacco have notorious effects on blood pressure. Processed Foods & Sodium, Alcohol, Caffeine & Tobacco not only contribute to raising your blood pressure immediately, they also have long term cumulative affects on blood pressure, weight and overall health. 

Sodium & Processed Foods 

When you eat a diet high in sodium and processed foods, you place unnecessary strain on your body that results in high blood pressure. 

What happens is, the sodium in your food, raises the sodium levels in your blood, which wreaks having on everything. 

Sodium reduces the ability of the kidneys to eliminate excess water, which results in higher blood pressure, due to the extra fluid, and the extra pressure places strain on your blood vessels.

It isn’t enough to not salt your food with salt from the salt shaker, you have to eliminate and reduce refined and processed foods that are made with large amounts of sodium. Many obvious foods like fast food, contain added sodium, but you’ll also find high amounts of sodium in many other types of food such as:

Canned Soups

Canned Fruits and Vegetables

Salad Dressings

Canned Beans

Pasta

Cereal

Bread

Processed Foods

Not only are processed foods high in sodium, they are also typically full of refined, sugary carbs and unhealthy fats, combined with low protein. 

Typically refined processed foods contain less fiber, which isn’t good for your metabolism. Fiber, in addition to keeping you feeling full for longer, also keeps your digestive system functioning optimally. 

When you eat a diet that doesn’t balance your macro-nutrients and moderates your overall caloric intake, you gain weight. 

In this way the effects of refined and processed foods have a compound effect on your blood pressure by the complications of salt and weight gain.

Understanding Sodium

Salt contributes to weight gain as eating salty foods, makes you crave salty foods, and makes you hungrier and thirstier. 

This would be okay if you ate healthy foods and drank water, but when you eat salty chips and crave more salty chips and drink a big sugar filled soda when you are thirsty…well…hopefully you can see that this pattern is not healthy.

Many of the foods high in sodium, aren’t even foods that we consider to be, ‘salty.’ So it’s important to know, what is in the foods that you buy and eat. 

Food manufacturers use salt not only for its flavor benefits, but also to preserve foods. Salt not only changes flavor, it also modifies texture. 

As a food preservative salt is added on its own and it’s included in many other types of food preservatives, and the amounts can quickly add up to more salt, than you need in your diet.

On average table and sea salt is 40% sodium with each teaspoon containing on average about 2300mg of sodium. 

It’s estimated that the body needs less than 500 mg of sodium per day to function optimally. However, it’s okay consume up to 1500 mg per day, to maintain a healthy diet. 

But due to the high amounts of sodium in so many foods it’s not uncommon for people to consume well over 3000 mg per day, especially when they eat diets high in refined and processed foods.

Food Labels

Start looking at the labels of your favorite packaged foods, you’ll be surprised at how much is in foods, especially in the foods that you don’t consider salty. 

It’s very important to maintaining normal blood pressure, to monitor your sodium intake from these types of foods…which means sticking to portions, and keeping track of the foods you eat in a food journal. 

Or if that seems like an impossible task, stop buying these foods and eat less refined and processed foods and more whole foods.

Alcohol

Drinking alcohol can increase your blood pressure. Drinking 2 or more drinks in one sitting can raise your blood pressure temporarily, while consistent drinking can lead to long term raised blood pressure.

Alcohol can increase blood pressure by approximately 1 mmHg for each 10 g alcohol. However it is reversible within 2-4 weeks of abstinence or reduction in alcohol intake.

A drink is:

12 ounces (355 milliliters) of beer

5 ounces (148 milliliters) of wine 

1.5 ounces (44 milliliters) of 80-proof distilled spirits

Moderate drinking is considered okay, but remember that moderate drinking is considered to be:

Two drinks a day for men younger than age 65

One drink a day for men age 65 and older

One drink a day for women of any age

If you’ve been drinking heavily, you can lower your blood pressure by cutting back and moderating your drinking in as soon as 1 week or 10 days. You can lower your systolic blood pressure as much as 2 to 4 mm Hg and your diastolic blood pressure by 1 to 2 mm Hg.

Keep in mind that alcohol contains calories and may contribute to unwanted weight gain, both from the alcohol and any mixers that you drink.

Caffeine

Caffeine can dramatically increase your blood pressure, even if you don’t have high blood pressure. 

Researchers are still not sure what causes this spike in blood pressure. Though it is suspected that caffeine blocks a hormone that helps keep your arteries widened. 

We know that people who regularly drink caffeinated beverages have a higher average blood pressure than do those who don’t drink caffeinated beverages. 

If you have high blood pressure, you can reduce the amount of caffeine you drink to 200 milligrams a day — about the same amount as in two 355–millileter cups of brewed coffee. 

Also, avoid caffeine right before activities that naturally increase your blood pressure, such as exercise, weightlifting or hard physical labor.

You can check on the effects of caffeine to your blood pressure, by checking your blood pressure within 45 to 90 minutes of drinking a caffeinated beverage. 

If your blood pressure increases by five to 10 points, you may be sensitive to the blood pressure raising effects of caffeine. 

If you decide to reduce, caffeine, do so slowly to alleviate headaches and other symptoms associated with caffeine withdrawal.

Tobacco

Using tobacco can raise your blood pressure temporarily, and the chemical compounds in tobacco can damage the lining of your artery walls. 

When your arteries are damaged, they narrow, increasing your blood pressure. 

Even if you don’t use tobacco or smoke, secondhand smoke also can increase your blood pressure…so if you spend a lot of time with people who smoke…you are putting yourself at risk.

Using tobacco can raise your heart rate by as much as 25 % and raise your systolic pressure as much as 12 mm Hg. 

Typically when the blood pressure is raised by an external stimulant, the body triggers a survival response, which tries to lower the heart rate and dilate blood vessels to lower blood pressure…however…these responses do not work with tobacco. 

Tobacco raises heart rate and blood pressure, while also blocking the body’s normal response to lower blood pressure and heart rate. Long term use of tobacco leads not only to higher blood pressure, but also to a greater risk of cardiovascular disease. 

Nutrition 101

So far we’ve talked about BMI and refined and processed foods, and you have a good idea that you are overweight and that refined and processed foods are bad for you. 

Before we go any further, we are going to talk about some nutrition basics, that you can begin to apply to your diet. 

What is Nutrition?

We talk a lot about proper nutrition, but what is it? 

Simply put…nutrition is the science and study of the interactions of the substances and compounds in food that provide us with energy to live and for our bodies to function optimally. 

Nutrition is concerned not only with macro and micro-nutrients but with food intake, absorption, bio-availability and elimination. Proper nutrition is essential to our health and our ability to heal our bodies.

What we eat every day is due largely by what is available and by what we are used to eating, what we are familiar with and with what tastes good to us. 

Eating healthy food requires that we know how much food we need to eat, and what that food needs to contain to provide us with energy and nutrients to be healthy.

Macro Nutrients

Macronutrients are the big building blocks of nutrition and they are: Fat, Protein and Carbohydrates.

Fat:

Fat is an essential part of a healthy diet diet.  Fat not only supplies our bodies with energy, we need it to absorb fat-soluble vitamins. With 9 calories per gram, fat contains more energy than any other macro-nutrient. Typically a healthy adult on a 2000 calorie per day diet, should receive 30% of their calories from fat and should be eating about 65g of fat per day.  

Carbohydrates:

Carbohydrates are an essential source of energy and provide the body with glucose, which is to support bodily functions and physical activity. But not all carbohydrates are good…some carbohydrate-rich foods are better than others:

The good guys are—unprocessed or minimally processed whole grains, vegetables, fruits and beans—promote good health by delivering vitamins, minerals, fiber, and a host of important micro-nutrients….While the bad guys are: 

Highly processed or refined foods, like: white bread, pastries, sodas, French fries, cakes and cookies.  These foods are full of easily digested carbohydrates that contribute to weight gain and interfere with weight loss.

Protein:

Protein is found in every cell in your body and it is essential to health and life. 

Protein not only supplies you with energy it is needed for growth, development, repair and maintenance for all body systems. 

Protein is found in both meat and plant foods and healthy adults should eat 0.5 to 1.0 grams of protein per pound of body weight depending on their activity level and goals.

Calories

In addition to balancing your intake of macro-nutrients, you’ll want to moderate your overall intake of energy, also known as total calories 

When you start to eat for macros and start eating less refined and processed foods, counting calories isn’t as important, but you still need to know how much food you need to be eating every day. 

Modern foods are sold in value and super sizes so we often have an unrealistic idea of what a healthy portion or serving of food should look like.

How many calories you should be eating varies by your age, your sex, your activity level and your goals. 

But typically recommendations for healthy adults are based on a 2000 calories a day diet. How many calories you need needs to be in line with your calorie needs and your activity level. 

When you take in more calories than you need, your body stores the excess as fat. Once you reduce your daily intake of calories your body will burn the stored fat as energy, and you will lose weight.

Micro-Nutrients

Micro-nutrients are essential to health, but they are only needed in small or trace amounts. Micro-nutrients include vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients.

It is important to eat a healthy varied diet to ensure that you get all the micro-nutrients and phyto-nutrients that your body needs. 

You can support your body’s needs for these compounds by taking supplements and by eating a healthy varied whole food diet. 

Phyto-nutrients are most often found in plants and can help to boost your immune system and ward off disease and illness. 

Micro-nutrients play a crucial role in regulating and lowering your blood pressure…but not all micro-nutrients are beneficial…sodium, a micro-nutrient is known to raise blood pressure while, potassium, calcium and magnesium have all been proven to lower blood pressure.

Now that you understand what nutrition and macro and micro nutrients are, we are going to talk about applying these concepts to, real life and real food. 

Don’t worry, it’s not gonna be complicated…

Macro-Nutrients and Whole Food

All food contains macro nutrients, some foods contain more of one, like meat, which has lots of protein and some fat but not so much carbohydrates. 

This is why it is important to eat a varied diet, to make sure you get adequate amounts of the nutrients that you need. 

Modern food trends make eating refine and processed foods easy and convenient, except they concentrate macro’s and we end up with a bigger and bigger waistline. 

Eating whole foods sounds great…but it can often be overwhelming and the taste of the foods can be disappointing. 

It’s not uncommon that when folks start eating whole foods, that they miss refined carbs, especially the sugary and salty ones, the very foods that make us gain weight and that keep our blood pressure high. 

But it doesn’t have to be this way…in fact…it shouldn’t be this way, it’s a great tribute to food marketing that makes us think we deserve to eat foods that make us fat and unhealthy. 

I’m here to tell you a different story, you deserve to eat whole food that helps your body regulate weight and that keeps you healthy. 

Transitioning to whole foods is not only better for your waistline, it’s also easier on your wallet, sure you’ll buy more expensive items from time to time, but they last longer as they are more nutrient dense than refined and processed foods. 

If you just wanted to eat whole foods, because you wanted to eat healthier I’d tell you to transition slowly…however…as your waistline is likely as large as it ever has been and your blood pressure is going through the roof… I am going to tell you to take a more pro-active approach and jump right in. 

If you are anything like me…you are busy and spending time in the kitchen is usually a luxury…but at this point it’s become a necessity. 

So this is what you are going to, you are going to clean out your pantry, and get rid of all the unhealthy refined and processed foods that are increasing your blood pressure, and then you are going to replace them with healthy whole foods. 

Don’t worry…we are going to walk through it together and later I’m going to help you plan a complete 4-week plan…well, actually we’re not going to do it together…I’ve already done it for it, all you have to do is follow it. 

So let’s talk about cleaning out the cupboards…you’re going to want to clear out all the salty refined and processed foods in your kitchen…as well as the sugary ones…and by clean out I mean pack them up and get rid of them, don’t eat them in one last junk binge. 

In fact, I want you to only keep the foods that look as close as possible to what they look like in nature. That’s the easiest way to tell if a food is a ‘whole food,’ by what it looks like. 

Things like meats, nuts, seeds, dairy, fruits, leafy greens and vegetables you can keep…things like donuts and salty snack foods have to go. 

When you are looking at something like peanut or nut butter and deciding whether or not to keep it, read the label. If the product doesn’t contain a long list of unpronounceable ingredients and has low sodium, keep it. 

Whole foods are great, because they are one stop shopping…not only for macro’s but also micro-nutrients (which we’re going to go over in a bit). Whole foods contain protein, fats and carbohydrates and most importantly, fiber. 

Fiber is essential to speeding up your metabolism and for making you feel longer, we’ll go into more about fiber…but for now feel good because you are laying the foundation to weight-loss and lower blood pressure. 

How to Re-Stock Your Pantry

Before you run out and raid the produce department of your local grocery, let’s talk about how to re-stock your pantry. 

If you are like me…you probably have many go-to foods that make up the majority of your diet. 

The foods that you can grab and eat on the run or whip up quickly at the end of the day. 

When I first started to change my diet and started eating whole foods, I made it easy on myself and that is what I am going to recommend that you do. 

What you need to do is figure out how to replace all the unhealthy high blood pressure inducing foods that you currently eat, with foods that will not only shrink your waistline and lower your blood pressure, but that will also taste good. 

Yeah, that’s the tough part. But like I said, I made it easy on myself. 

Let me tell you a little bit about my story. I was so busy that I usually skipped breakfast, except for a pot or 2 of coffee. 

I’d end up with low blood sugar mid-morning and eat salty or sugary snack foods, like chips, crackers or donuts and pastries…

So…I cut back to 1 good cup of coffee and started making smoothies for breakfast during the work week. I used milk, a banana, some spinach and a scoop of protein powder. 

On weekends when I had more time, I made bigger breakfasts if I wanted them, but focused on healthier foods, so I made things like oatmeal with fruit and nuts, and vegetable omelets. 

That one change, made a world of difference, I no longer ate mid-morning junk food and I drastically reduced my caffeine intake. 

After having such a good start to the day, I was less inclined to eat a massive cheeseburger for lunch, as I wasn’t starving and started eating salads with protein…

Then I added a healthy nutrient dense snack in the afternoon, instead of my usual sugary caffeine loaded soft drink and chips…and this is what is going to happen to you too.

So when you shop, buy enough for 4-5 days and buy foods that you like.

If you’ve been eating processed cereal, replace it with oatmeal. Oatmeal can be made the night before in a jar in the fridge. 

Just add ½ cup oatmeal, ¾ cup milk, cinnamon and some chopped apples and nuts. Meals like this are great…as you can grab it on your way out the door if your morning is hectic. 

So you’ll want to ‘replace’ your foods, one by one. Because getting rid of everything without a plan is only going to lead to disaster. Stock up on simple foods that you can prepare easily:

Lean Proteins

Meats, Fish & Eggs

Healthy Fats:

Olive Oil, Nuts and Seeds, Avocado

Leafy Greens

Spinach, Kale, Swiss Chard, Baby Greens

Vegetables:

Carrots, Eggplant, Peppers, Cucumbers, Broccoli, Squash

Fruits:

Berries, Melon, Apples, Oranges, Bananas

Healthy Grains

Oatmeal, Quinoa, Brown Rice

Dairy

Milk, Yogurt, Cottage Cheese

With just this list alone you can make all kinds of meals and snacks, like Kale Chips, Stuffed Peppers, Fruit Salad, Smoothies, Yogurt & Fruit Parfait, Soups and Salads. 

The point isn’t to go out and buy foods you are unfamiliar with…the point is to eat healthier with foods that you are familiar with, that are readily available. 

But remember…I’m going to outline a full 4-week meal plan, so you don’t have to.

So now that we’ve you’ve got a good idea of the macros, let’s look at the micros…

Micro Nutrients and Vitamin Supplements

…micro nutrients include trace minerals and vitamins that we need in small amounts in order for our bodies to be as healthy as possible.

At the bare minimum you should be taking a daily multi-vitamin, each and every day, appropriate to your age and sex. 

So… this…is where you get up, and go take one, then you leave the bottle in a handy, but safe place…so you remember to take one tomorrow, and the day after that, and the day after that.

When you take vitamins you have to understand the difference between water-soluble and fat soluble. 

Water Soluble means that the vitamins can be absorbed and broken down in water, but fat soluble vitamins need fat present to be absorbed and broken down. 

What this means is that you have to eat fat and drink water when you take vitamin supplements in order to make the micros bio-available in your body. 

You can easily take multiple supplements together to accomplish this, like taking your vitamins with Omega’3 Oil or Coconut Oil Capsules. 

Taking a multi-vitamin is the first thing you need to start doing to help lower your blood pressure. 

Vitamins helps support every function of your body and will boost your immune system. 

The next step is to take supplements specifically to help you lower your blood pressure, let’s look at what those are…

…the 3 micro-nutrients recognized and scientifically proven to lower your blood pressure are:

Potassium

Magnesium

Calcium

While we are going to look at each one…why it works…and how much you need…it isn’t enough to pick one or two…you need to make sure that you getting enough of all three, as they work together to lower your blood pressure.

Potassium

The average adult has a recommended daily intake of potassium of 4,700 milligrams per day to lower blood pressure. 

Potassium helps your body regulate sodium levels and it is recommended that you get twice as much potassium as sodium,

Potassium is found in supplement form and in foods. As you begin to eat healthier you will include more potassium in your diet, so you should consider a supplement and begin including it in your routine…starting now. 

Over time as you expand your healthy eating you can naturally include potassium in your diet by eating foods high in potassium, while also avoiding sodium and sugary carbs, by adding these foods:

  • Leafy Greens
  • Mushrooms
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Lima beans
  • Peas
  • Bananas
  • Tomatoes
  • Oranges
  • Cantaloupe 
  • Grapefruit 
  • Raisins 
  • Halibut
  • Tuna
  • Molasses

Magnesium 

The average adult has a recommended daily intake of magnesium of 500 milligrams per day…to replace what the body loses through perspiration, stress and normal body functions and to help lower blood pressure. 

Magnesium helps potassium and calcium do their jobs and pass through cell walls, while also helping to relax artery walls. 

While there are natural sources of magnesium and you’ll want to include them in your diet, magnesium is found in low concentrations so supplementing is a smart choice.

  • Green Vegetables
  • Wheat Germ
  • Soybeans
  • Figs
  • Corn
  • Apples
  • Nuts and Seeds 

Calcium

Calcium is not only essential for strong bones, it also helps to lower your blood pressure by helping your blood vessels contract and expand.

All the while also helping your body balance sodium levels and helps keep artery walls from tightening and if your blood doesn’t have enough calcium, your body will rob calcium from your bones. 

The average adult has a recommended daily intake of calcium of 1,200 milligrams per day to maintain strong bones and to lower blood pressure.

While dairy products are a traditional source of calcium, you can also find calcium in these foods naturally:

  • Dark Leafy Greens
  • Figs
  • Almonds
  • Oranges
  • White Beans
  • Salmon
  • Sardines
  • Seaweed

What Goes In…Must Go Out: Fiber

So now that we’ve talked about digestive intake…it’s time to talk about digestive output…it’s not everybody’s favorite topic…but, it’s really important to helping your body regulate weight, which helps you lower your blood pressure…

…so…

…let’s jump in.

Diets that are high are processed and refined foods are typically very low in fiber. Fiber is found as a natural compound in plant foods, in fact fiber is a nutrient, it’s a carbohydrate. 

However, fiber is not broken down and absorbed into the bloodstream like other carbohydrates. 

Fiber has no calories as it simply passes through the entire digestive tract. Fiber is what gives plants structure, like 2×4’s that frame a house.

Fiber makes you feel full faster…and…longer…and…adds bulk to your diet, which is why it’s so important when it comes to weight loss. 

In fact research proves, that people who regularly and consistently eat a high fiber diet are leaner and experience very moderate weight fluctuations.

Whole food sources of fiber include:

  • Nuts & Seeds 
  • Whole Grains
  • Leafy Greens & Vegetables
  • Fruits

Fiber is very effective at helping your digestive system maintain a regular elimination cycle, which will help your metabolism function as fast as possible. 

As soon as everyone knows that fiber will help you lose weight they run out and but fiber supplements and high fiber foods and start eating them…

…and everyone does this until…they become gassy, bloated, constipated or even have diarrhea… 

Then they become convinced that fiber is the worst thing that ever happened to them and they stop eating it and avoid it in the future…

…except…

The bloating, gas, constipation and diarrhea are all signs that the fiber is cleaning out your digestive system, and that you need to eat more fiber, all the time. 

In fact, you lose between 5 to 10 lbs. just from cleaning out your digestive system alone, and your stomach will lose its consistent bloated look and feel.

When you are changing your diet for something as serious as high blood pressure, you have to allow the fiber to do its job and you have to allow your body to adjust. 

You won’t continue to have digestive distress once the fiber does its job and gets your digestive system in shape. But here’s the thing with fiber, you have to make sure you get enough either through your diet or through supplement, every day.

Start out with fiber supplements, and take them every day and then begin to add some of the high fiber foods to your diet:

  • Raspberries & Strawberries
  • Oranges
  • Bananas
  • Apples & Pears
  • Almonds 
  • Pecans
  • Kale 
  • Beet & Turnip Greens
  • Artichokes
  • Broccoli
  • Peas
  • Chia Seeds

As you begin to eat more fiber, you also have to learn how to properly hydrate your body…

Hydrate with…Water!

…staying properly hydrated is an essential part of weight loss and of lowering your blood pressure.

Water is the only way and the best way to hydrate your body, and you should be drinking at least, half of your body weight in fluid ounces of water, each and everyday day. 

When you stay properly hydrated not only will you support your digestive elimination, you’ll also reduce your overall hunger and have more energy. 

As your body can confuse thirst and hunger signals, it is important to drink water before you feel thirst. When you experience thirst your body is already dehydrated there are mixed signals being sent out for both water and food in your body and more often than not, you will respond most quickly to the hunger signal. 

This is partly due to dehydration making causing you to believe that you are hungry and need to eat when what you really need is a glass of water. 

Dehydration will also make you constipated, fell sleepy and groggy and dry out your skin.

You’ll know you are drinking enough water when you urinate frequently and your urine is a very pale yellow or even clear.

When you begin to drink water, all day, every day…you are going to notice some seriously awesome things happen:

  • You will become regular
  • You will eat less
  • You will have more energy
  • You will have improved mental clarity
  • You will improve the health and appearance of your skin 
  • Water will make your weight loss flow…pun…intended.

Eat Real Food – Top Foods to Lower Blood Pressure

So…now is when we get to start putting food on a plate and get you on your way to lowering your blood pressure and your weight. 

The meal plan is designed to work with your lifestyle and your eating patterns. 

You’ll be eating 3 meals and 1-2 snacks per day…as you get to decide…what to eat, when. 

As I mentioned earlier, the meals are simple, but that doesn’t man boring or tasteless, just means you are not going to be spending an eternity in the kitchen. 

The foods you are going to be eating are nutrient dense, and that’s what helps you to lower your blood pressure and to lose weight. 

Between applying stress management and being properly hydrated, well rested, moderately exercising and eating healthy whole food you are going to drop pounds and lower your blood pressure.

In the next 4 weeks, you’ll enjoy meals and snacks based on;

  • Healthy Protein
  • Healthy Fat
  • Fruit
  • Leafy Greens & Vegetables
  • Low-Fat Dairy 
  • Nuts & Seeds 

The meal plan is designed to help you achieve maximum results in 4 weeks and that’s why you are going to see lots of the following foods on the meal plan:

  • Low-Fat Yogurt
  • Flax
  • Olive Oil
  • Salmon
  • Mackerel
  • Dark Chocolate
  • Lite Cheese
  • Berries
  • Almonds
  • Figs
  • Apples
  • Pomegranate

30 Day Blood Pressure Diet Plan

Week 1Day 1 

Breakfast

Baked Egg Muffins

3 eggs

½ cup broccoli, chopped

¼ cup onion, chopped

¼ cup kale, chopped

1 tablespoon olive oil

Salt and pepper to taste

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees, and lightly oil 2-3 muffin tins with ½ the olive oil. Saute the vegetables in the remaining olive oil, until tender and evenly distribute the vegetables in the tins, beat the eggs and fill each muffin tin ¾’s full. Bake in the oven for 15-18 minutes until the eggs are set and lightly golden on the tops.

Calories: 346, Fat: 27g, Carbohydrates: 9g, Protein: 19g

Lunch

Chicken Apricot Salad

6 oz. of cooked chicken breast chopped

1 apricot, chopped

2 cups chopped kale

2 tablespoons sunflower seeds

1 tablespoon Olive oil  

2 tablespoons APPLE CIDER VINEGAR

Pinch each: ginger & cayenne

Place all ingredients in a large bowl and toss very well.

Dinner 

Mackerel with Greens

1 6oz fillet Mackerel

1 teaspoon olive oil

Pinch ea paprika, garlic powder and cayenne

Lemon wedges

Preheat the oven to 350. Drizzle the mackerel with the olive oil and season with the seasonings, bake in the oven for 15-18 minutes until the fillet is lightly golden and has an internal temperature of 145 degrees. Serve with lemon wedges.

2 cups collard/beet or kale greens

¼ cup ea onions and celery

Pinch ea of cayenne and garlic powder

1 tablespoon coconut oil

Heat coconut oil in a large skillet add collards, leeks celery and seasonings. Sauté until greens are wilted and vegetables are soft.

Calories: 516, Fat: 23g, Carbohydrates: 19g, Protein: 60g

Snack

Bean Dip

1/2 cup of cooked pinto or kidney beans

1 tablespoon olive oil

¼ cup each: onion, carrots and celery

Pinch ea of cayenne, cumin, garlic powder and chili powder

Saute the vegetables in the olive oil, until they are soft and golden, add the beans and cook until hot. Mash with a fork or pulse in the food processor. Eat with broccoli, celery or carrot.

Calories: 151, Fat: 5g, Carbohydrates: 20g, Protein: 7g

Day 2

Breakfast

Kale Omelet

¼ cup leeks. chopped

½ cup kale, chopped

1 tablespoon olive oil

½ teaspoon herb seasoning

4 eggs

Saute the leeks, kale and seasonings in half of the olive oil, until they are tender, remove from the pan and set aside. Beat the eggs and add the remaining olive oil back to the pan and pour the eggs in. Allow the eggs to set and lightly stir, once the bottom is set, flip the omelet over to cook it through. Place the omelet on a plate and add the filling, and fold the omelet over.

Calories: 388, Fat: 31g, Carbohydrates: 5g, Protein: 23g

Lunch

Citrus Salmon Salad with Spianch 

1 grapefruit, chopped

1 orange, chopped

½ lime or lemon, chopped

Combine all fruits together

¾ cup canned salmon, drained

2 cups spinach

Olive oil

Combine all ingredients in a large bowl and toss well and season to taste.

Calories: 310, Fat: 7g, Carbohydrates: 30g, Protein: 27g

Dinner

Baked Stuffed Squash

1 Acorn squash cut in half and deseeded.

¼ cup ea: onions, carrots and celery, all diced

6 oz. ground turkey

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 teaspoon herb blend

Big pinch ea: cayenne and garlic powder

Saute the meat, vegetables and seasonings in the olive oil, until the meat is browned. Divide the meat between the 2 halves and bake in the oven for 40-45 minutes until the squash is soft and the meat temperature is 165 degrees.

Calories: 301, Fat: 13.5g, Carbohydrates: 29g, Protein: 20g

Snack

Brown Rice Balls

¾ cup cooked brown rice

½ cup of diced mixed vegetables: celery, spinach, carrots, peppers

2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar

Place vegetables in the apple cider vinegar in a small pot and bring to a boil, turn off the heat and let vegetables cool. Then mix with the brown rice and shape into snack sized balls.

Calories: 240, Fat: 4g, Carbohydrates: 11g, Protein: 12g

Day 3 

Breakfast

Almond/Kale Smoothie

¼ cup almonds

1 cup kale

1 ½ cups milk of choice

2-3 ice cubes (optional)

Pinch of cardamom

Place all ingredients in the blender and blend for 2-3 minutes until everything is very smooth.

Calories: 305, Fat: 12g, Carbohydrates: 30g, Protein:19g

Lunch

Sardine Wrap

1 whole wheat wrap

1 can sardines, drained

1 cup spinach

½ cup thinly sliced fennel

Juice of half a lemon or lime

½ teaspoon oregano

Layer the sardines, spinach, fennel and seasonings in the center of the wrap, add fresh juice, wrap everything up.

Calories: 285, Fat: 14g, Carbohydrates: 8g, Protein: 26g

Dinner

Apricot Glazed Chicken

2-3 pieces of chicken (wing, leg, thigh)

1 apricot, chopped

1 tablespoon olive oil

Pinch ea: pepper, garlic powder, red pepper flakes

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Pulse the apricot, olive oil and seasonings in a food processor. Place the chicken in a bowl and pour the apricots mixture over the chicken (you can let this marinate for an hour), then transfer the chicken to a baking dish and bake in the oven for 30-25 minutes until the internal temperature of the chicken is 165 degrees. Serve with 1 ½ cups of steamed broccoli

Calories: 479, Fat: 21g, Carbohydrates: 4g, Protein: 60g

Snack

Scotch Egg

1 boiled egg, peeled

3 oz. turkey sausage

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Press turkey sausage into a thin 4- inch patty and wrap around the egg. Bake in the oven for 20 minutes until sausage is browned and cooked through.

Calories: 229, Fat: 13g, Carbohydrates: 0g, Protein:29g

Day 4 

Breakfast

Citrus Salad w/Turkey Sausage

1 grapefruit, chopped

1 orange, chopped

½ cup pomegranate seeds

Combine all fruits together.

6 oz. ground turkey

Pinch ea: pepper, cayenne, paprika, garlic powder and sage

Mix meat and seasonings together very well, and shape meat into 3 patties. Saute the patties in a non-stick pan for 3-4 minutes on each side, until the meat is cooked through.

Calories: 459, Fat: 19g, Carbohydrates: 32g, Protein: 49g

Lunch

Bean Burrito

1 whole wheat tortilla

3/4 cup cooked pinto or kidney beans

1 cup kale

¼ cup leeks

1 tablespoon olive oil

Pinch ea: cumin, cayenne, oregano & chili powder

2 tablespoons plain Greek yogurt

Cook the kale and leeks in the olive oil, add beans and spices. While the beans are cooking, toast the tortilla in a pan or in the oven. Wrap the bean mixture in the tortilla. Garnish with Greek yogurt.

Calories: 769, Fat: 18g, Carbohydrates: 118g, Protein: 39g

Dinner

Pistachio Crusted Flounder

1 6oz fillet of flounder

1 egg white

¼ cup of pistachios, chopped

Preheat the oven to 350, beat the egg white until it is fluffy, add the macadamia nuts. Season the flounder with the and top with the egg white and nut mixture. Bake the fish in the oven for 15 -20 minutes until the internal temperature is 145 degrees.

Calories: 503, Fat: 28g, Carbohydrates: 14g, Protein: 51g

Snack

Granola

½ cup oats

1/4 cup mixed nuts & seeds

2 tablespoons grass fed butter

1 tablespoon honey

½ teaspoon cinnamon

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Melt the butter, honey and cinnamon together, pour over the oats and nuts/seeds. Stir well and transfer to a baking sheet. Bake in the oven for 20-25 minutes until the oats and nuts are toasted and lightly golden brown. Serving Size ¼ cup

Calories: 119, Fat: 9g, Carbohydrates: 9g, Protein: 3g

Day 5 

Breakfast

Oatmeal & Flax

2/3 cup of oats

1 tablespoon ground flax seed

1 ½ cups of water

½ teaspoon cinnamon

¼ cup blueberries

2 tablespoons chopped almonds

Cook oats, flax, sea salt and cinnamon in the water over medium heat, for 10 minutes. Serve with blueberries and almonds.

Calories: 786, Fat: 44g, Carbohydrates: 78g, Protein: 30g

Lunch

Grilled Chicken & Apple Sandwich

2 slices of whole grain bread

1-2 tablespoons butter

4 oz. thinly sliced chicken breast

1/ 2 thinly sliced apple

1 tablespoon sliced onion

1 tablespoon whole grain mustard

Butter the outside of the bread and layer the mustard, onion, apple and chicken in the bread. Cook in a sandwich press or in a skillet, until both sides are golden brown.

Calories: 432, Fat: 18g, Carbohydrates: 27g, Protein: 43g

Dinner

Lamb with Pomegranate Salsa

1 6 oz. lamb chop

1 tablespoon olive oil

½ teaspoon rosemary

Season the lamb chop with the rosemary, sauté in the olive oil over medium heat for 5-6 minutes on each side. Allow to rest for 10 minutes before serving.

½ cup pomegranate seeds

1 apricot diced

1 mandarin orange, diced

Pinch each: cumin, red pepper flakes, pepper and garlic powder.

Toss all ingredients together, refrigerate for at least an hour before serving.

Calories: 518, Fat: 27g, Carbohydrates: 22g, Protein: 49g

Snack 

Devilled Eggs

2 boiled eggs, cooled

1 tablespoon mayonnaise

½ teaspoon apple cider vinegar

Pinch ea: cayenne, paprika, garlic powder, 

Cut eggs in half, and scoop out the yolks. Mash the yolks with the mayonnaise, apple cider vinegar and seasonings, then place mashed seasoned yolk back into the 4 halves.

Calories: 183, Fat: 14g, Carbohydrates: 4g, Protein: 11g

Day 6

Breakfast

Egg & Sprout WW Tortilla

3 eggs

2 teaspoons olive oil

½ cups fresh sprouts

1 whole wheat tortilla

Season the eggs and scramble them in the olive oil. While the eggs are cooking, toast the tortilla in a pan or in the oven. When the eggs are cooked, layer the eggs and sprouts in the tortilla.

Calories: 409, Fat: 24g, Carbohydrates: 29g, Protein: 24g

Lunch 

Barley Vegetable Soup

2 cups vegetable or bone stock

3/4 cup cooked barley

½ cup ea: onions, carrots celery & sweet potatoes

Pinch of cayenne

1 teaspoon herb blend

Place all ingredients in a pot, bring to a simmer, reduce heat, cover and cook for 20 minutes until the vegetables are soft.

Calories: 637, Fat: 7g, Carbohydrates: 40g, Protein: 27g

Dinner

Curried Lentils & Chicken

½ cup lentils

4 oz. chicken, chopped

½ cups leeks

1 cup kale, chopped

2 teaspoons curry powder

2 tablespoons olive oil

2 cups water or stock

Cook curry powder, chicken, leeks and sweet potatoes in the olive oil for 6-8 minutes over medium heat, add lentils and water. Bring to a boil, cover and simmer on low heat for 25-30 minutes, add coconut milk right before serving.

Calories: 708, Fat: 19g, Carbohydrates: 74g, Protein:62g

Snack 

Sardines

1 can of sardines, drained

Juice of a half a lemon

Drizzle lemon juice over the sardines and enjoy.

Calories: 191, Fat: 10g, Carbohydrates: 0g, Protein: 23g

Day 7 

Breakfast

Blueberry Chia Yogurt Smoothie

1 cup blueberries, frozen

1 cup yogurt

1 tablespoon chia seeds

Pinch of ginger

Place all ingredients in the blender and blend for 3-4 minutes, until smooth.

Calories: 413, Fat: 13g, Carbohydrates: 48g, Protein: 21g

Lunch

Quinoa Turkey Bowl

3/4 cup cooked quinoa

4 oz. ground turkey

¾ cup broccoli, chopped

1 cup spinach

1 tablespoon olive oil

½ teaspoon herb blend

1 tablespoon pumpkin seeds

Saute ground turkey in the olive oil until half cooked, then add broccoli, spinach and seasonings, until everything is cooked through. Layer on top of quinoa in a bowl and garnish with pumpkin seeds.

Calories: 881, Fat: 38g, Carbohydrates: 87g, Protein:53g

Dinner

Beef & Broccoli Stir Fry

6 oz. beef cut into strips

1 cup of broccoli

½ cup each celery and carrot, thinly sliced

2 tablespoons coconut oil

1 teaspoon sesame seeds

Pinch ea of red pepper flakes, cinnamon, ginger and garlic powder

Heat the coconut oil over medium high heat in a large wok or skillet, add beef and stir fry for 3-4 minutes, add vegetables and seasonings, stir fry for 6 minutes until vegetables are softened and lightly golden. 

Calories: 631, Fat: 40g, Carbohydrates: 14g, Protein: 56g

Snack

BBQ Root Vege Chips

1 cup of mixed vegetables, thin sliced: beets, carrots, sweet potatoes, turnips, rutabagas

1 tablespoon olive oil

¼ teaspoon each: black pepper, paprika, garlic powder, cayenne pepper

Preheat the oven to 350. Toss root vegetables in olive oil and add seasonings. Toss well, lay flat on a baking sheet and bake in the oven for 20-25 minutes until the chips are golden and crisp.

Calories: 155, Fat: 14g, Carbohydrates: 8g, Protein:1g

Week 2 Day 1

Breakfast

Devilled Eggs

2 boiled eggs, cooled

1 tablespoon mayonnaise

½ teaspoon apple cider vinegar

Pinch ea: cayenne, paprika, garlic powder, 

Cut eggs in half, and scoop out the yolks. Mash the yolks with the mayonnaise, apple cider vinegar and seasonings, then place mashed seasoned yolk back into the 4 halves.

Calories: 183, Fat: 14g, Carbohydrates: 4g, Protein: 11g

Lunch

Lentil Burger

1 cup cooked lentils, drained

½ cup kale, chopped

¼ cup leeks, sliced

2 tablespoons walnuts, diced

Pinch each: pepper, cayenne, thyme, oregano

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and line a baking pan with baking paper. Combine all ingredients together in a bowl and mix well, form into 2 patties. Bake patties in the oven for 25 minutes. Serve on a bed of spinach.

Serves 2, Calories: 402, Fat: 5g, Carbohydrates: 60g, Protein: 27g

Dinner

Salmon with Mashed Rutabagas

1 6oz Salmon fillet

1 teaspoon olive oil

Pinch ea paprika, garlic powder and cayenne

Lemon wedges

Preheat the oven to 350. Drizzle the mackerel with the olive oil and season with the seasonings, bake in the oven for 15-18 minutes until the fillet is lightly golden and has an internal temperature of 145 degrees. Serve with lemon wedges.

11/2 cups rutabagas, chopped into 1 inch pieces

1 tablespoon coconut oil

Place the rutabagas in a pot and cover with water. Bring to a boil and cook until the rutabagas are soft. Drain (reserve a little bit of water). Mash the rutabagas with the coconut oil, adding the water as needed. 

Calories: 618, Fat: 44g, Carbohydrates: 12g, Protein: 44g

Snack 

Kale Chips

2 cups kale

1 tablespoon olive oil

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees. Toss the kale with the olive oil and fine sea salt to mix well. Lay the kale on a baking sheet and bake in the oven for 10-12 minutes until the kale is crispy and lightly browned. Allow to cool.

Calories: 149, Fat: 14g, Carbohydrates: 14g, Protein: 4g

Day 2 

Breakfast

Granola w/Yogurt

½ cup oats

1/4 cup mixed nuts & seeds

2 tablespoons grass fed butter

1 tablespoon honey

½ teaspoon cinnamon

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Melt the butter, honey, and cinnamon together, pour over the oats and nuts/seeds. Stir well and transfer to a baking sheet. Bake in the oven for 20-25 minutes until the oats and nuts are toasted and lightly golden brown.

Serving Size ¼ cup

Calories: 119, Fat: 9g, Carbohydrates: 9g, Protein: 3g

Lunch

Chicken, Fennel & Citrus Salad

1 grapefruit, chopped

1 orange, chopped

½ lime or lemon, chopped

Combine all fruits together

1 cup cooked chopped chicken

½ cup sliced fennel

2 cups spinach

1 cup kale

 Olive oil

Combine all ingredients in a large bowl and toss well and season to taste.

Calories: 310, Fat: 7g, Carbohydrates: 30g, Protein: 27g

Dinner

Baked Stuffed Potato

1 medium sized potato

½ cup shredded chicken

¾ cup steamed broccoli

2 tablespoons yogurt

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Cut the potato almost in half, and add the broccoli and the chicken. Bake in the oven for 15 minutes, top with the yogurt.

Calories: 297, Fat: 8, Carbohydrates: 28, Protein: 29

Snack

Sardines

1 can of sardines, drained

Juice of a half a lemon

Drizzle lemon juice over the sardines and enjoy.

Calories: 191, Fat: 10g, Carbohydrates: 0g, Protein: 23g

Day 3

Breakfast

Butternut Squash Porridge

1 butternut squash, seeded and chopped into 2 inch pieces

2 tablespoons walnuts

1/8 cup coconut milk

½ teaspoon cinnamon

Place the butternut squash pieces in a baking dish with 1 inch of water and bake at 350 degrees for 45 minutes, until the squash is soft. Allow to cool and scape the cooked squash from the peel. Mash the squash with the seasoning and milk and garnish with walnuts.

Calories: 256, Fat: 17g, Carbohydrates: 28g, Protein:7g

Lunch

Chicken Apricot Salad

6 oz. of cooked chicken breast chopped

1 apricot, chopped

2 cups chopped kale

2 tablespoons sunflower seeds

1 tablespoon Olive oil  

2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar

Pinch each: ginger & cayenne

Place all ingredients in a large bowl and toss very well.

Calories: 516, Fat: 23g, Carbohydrates: 19g, Protein: 60g

Dinner

Beef & Broccoli Stir Fry

6 oz. beef cut into strips

1 cup of broccoli

½ cup each celery and carrot, thinly sliced

2 tablespoons coconut oil

1 teaspoon sesame seeds

Pinch ea of red pepper flakes, cinnamon, ginger and garlic powder

Heat the coconut oil over medium high heat in a large wok or skillet, add beef and stir fry for 3-4 minutes, add vegetables and seasonings, stir fry for 6 minutes until vegetables are softened and lightly golden. 

Calories: 631, Fat: 40g, Carbohydrates: 14g, Protein: 56g

Snack

Roasted Nut & Seed Mix

1/4 cup mixed nuts & seeds

1/8 teaspoon seasoning (curry, chili or cinnamon)

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Toss the nuts/seeds with the seasoning. Stir well and transfer to a baking sheet. Bake in the oven for 15 minutes until the nuts are toasted and lightly golden brown.

Calories: 137, Fat: 12g, Carbohydrates: 5g, Protein:5g

Day 4

Breakfast

Scotch Eggs

1 boiled egg, peeled

3 oz. turkey sausage

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Press turkey sausage into a thin 4- inch patty and wrap around the egg. Bake in the oven for 20 minutes until sausage is browned and cooked through.

Calories: 229, Fat: 13g, Carbohydrates: 0g, Protein:29g

Lunch

Lamb & Quinoa Bowl

3/4 cup cooked Barley, drained

¾ cubed lamb

¼ cup each: onion, carrot and spinach

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 teaspoon herb blend

2 tablespoons chopped almonds

Saute the lamb and vegetables in the olive oil with the seasoning for 6-8 minutes, until the lamb is cooked through and browned. Place the barley in a bowl and add the lamb and vegetables, garnish with the almonds.

Calories: 705, Fat: 27g, Carbohydrates: 75g, Protein: 23g

Dinner

Grilled Mackerel with Brussel Sprouts

1 6oz fillet Mackerel

1 teaspoon olive oil

Pinch ea paprika, garlic powder and cayenne

Lemon wedges

Preheat the oven to 350. Drizzle the mackerel with the olive oil and season with the seasonings, bake in the oven for 15-18 minutes until the fillet is lightly golden and has an internal temperature of 145 degrees. Serve with lemon wedges.

1 ½ cups Brussel sprouts, halved

1 tablespoon coconut oil, melted

Toss the Brussel sprouts in the coconut oil and roast in the oven for 20-25 minutes.

Calories: 618, Fat: 44g, Carbohydrates: 12g, Protein: 44g

Snack

Pear Bars

1.5 cups oats

1/2 cup walnuts, chopped

¼ cup sunflower seeds

1 teaspoon cinnamon 

1 cup pear, seeded and diced

1 cup low fat milk

1 egg

1 teaspoon vanilla

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Lightly oil a 9×9 baking pan. Combine the oats, almonds, sunflower seeds and seasoning, add the pear, milk, egg and vanilla, mix well. Place the batter into the pan and bake for 35 minutes. Allow to cool and cut into 9 bars.

Calories: 113, Fat: 5g, Carbohydrates: 14g, Protein: 5g

Day 5 

Breakfast

Broiled Grapefruit w/Eggs

1 grapefruit, halved

3 eggs, beaten

1 tablespoon coconut oil, melted

Preheat the broiler. Drizzle half the coconut oil on the grapefruit, and broil for 4-5 minutes until the edges are browned.

Heat the remaining oil in a saute pan over medium heat. Add the eggs and scramble, season to taste with salt and pepper.

Calories: 347, Fat: 26g, Carbohydrates: 11, Protein: 17g

Lunch

Spilt Pea Soup

¼ cup each: sliced onions, carrots and celery

½ cup split peas

1 tablespoon olive oil

¾ teaspoon marjoram

Pinch of cayenne

In a small soup pot, cook the vegetables and seasonings in the olive oil, for 5-6 minutes, add the split peas and water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, cover and simmer for 25 minutes. 

Calories: 402, Fat: 5g, Carbohydrates: 60g, Protein: 27g

Dinner

Roast Lamb with Buckwheat Pilaf

6 oz. lamb chop

1 tablespoon olive oil

½ teaspoon rosemary

Season the lamb chop with the rosemary, roast in the oven for 20 minutes. Allow to rest for 10 minutes before serving.

¼ cup buckwheat

¼ cup each: sliced leeks and carrot

1 cup kale

1 cup water

Place buckwheat and vegetables in a small pot with the water. Bring to a simmer, reduce heat and cook for 15-20 minutes. 

Calories: 633, Fat: 27g, Carbohydrates: 41g, Protein: 55g

Snack

Beef Jerky

6 oz thinly sliced beef

½ tablespoon Bragg Liquid Aminos

Pinch ea: pepper, cayenne & garlic powder.

Dehydrate in a food dehydrator according to manufacturer’s directions or in a 200 degree oven for 6-8 hours.

Calories: 355, Fat: 10g, Carbohydrates: 0g, Protein: 51g

Day 6 

Breakfast

Amaranth Apricot Muffins

½ cup ea amaranth, buckwheat and whole wheat flour.

1 teaspoon baking powder

½ teaspoon baking soda

½ teaspoon cinnamon

1 egg, beaten

2 tablespoons honey or maple syrup

¾ cup low fat milk 

2 tablespoons oil

1 cup apricot, peeled, seeded and diced

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees, line 6 muffin tins. Sift together the flours, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, then add the egg, honey, milk and oil, mix to make a smooth batter, add apricot. Divide batter evenly into the muffin tins and bake for 20-25 minutes.

Serving Size 2 Calories: 496, Fat: 15g, Carbohydrates: 79g, Protein: 15g

Lunch

Chicken Wrap

1 whole wheat wrap

1 cup canned chicken, drained

1 cup spinach

½ cup thinly sliced fennel

Juice of half a lemon or lime

½ teaspoon oregano

Layer the chicken, spinach, fennel and seasonings in the center of the wrap, add fresh juice, wrap everything up.

Calories: 285, Fat: 14g, Carbohydrates: 8g, Protein: 26g

Dinner

Salmon with Pasta

1 cup whole grain pasta

1 cup broccoli

Cook pasta according to directions on the package and add the broccoli and cook for 4-5 minutes at the end. 

1 6oz Salmon fillet

1 teaspoon olive oil

Pinch ea paprika, garlic powder and cayenne

Preheat the oven to 350. Drizzle the salmon with the olive oil and season with the seasonings, bake in the oven for 15-18 minutes until the fillet is lightly golden and has an internal temperature of 145 degrees. 

Snack

Turkey Meatballs

6 oz ground turkey

1 teaspoon herb blend

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and line a baking sheet with baking paper. Mix turkey with seasonings and shape into small meatballs. Bake in the oven for 20 minutes, until the turkey reaches an internal temperature of 165 degrees. Allow to cool

Calories: 333, Fat: 18g, Carbohydrates: 0g, Protein: 46g

Day 7 

Breakfast

Apricot Almond Smoothie

¼ cup almonds

1 medium apricot, pitted

1 ½ cups milk of choice

2-3 ice cubes (optional)

Pinch each of cardamom & cinnamon

Place all ingredients in the blender and blend for 2-3 minutes until everything is very smooth.

Calories: 305, Fat: 12g, Carbohydrates: 30g, Protein:19g

Lunch

Curried Squash Soup

¼ cup each: onions, carrots and celery

1 tablespoon olive oil

¾ teaspoon curry powder

1 ½ cups of butternut squash, peeled and cubed

2 cups of water or stock

Saute the vegetables and spices in the olive oil in a soup pot, until the vegetables are soft. Add the squash and water, bring to a boil. Reduce the heat, cover and simmer for 25-30 minutes, until the squash is soft.

Calories: 295, Fat: 7g, Carbohydrates: 56g, Protein: 12g

Dinner 

Chicken Burrito with Pumpkin Yogurt Sauce

1 whole wheat tortilla

¾ cup chicken, cut into bite sized pieces

¼ cup ea: leeks, kale and broccoli

½ tablespoon olive oil

Pinch ea: garlic powder, cumin and chili powder

Saute the chicken, vegetables and seasonings in the olive oil until the chicken is cooked through and golden browned.

¼ cup  low fat yogurt

2 tablespoons pumpkin seeds

Pinch ea: cayenne, chili powder, garlic powder and cumin

 to taste

Blend all ingredients together. 

Calories: 465, Fat: 19g, Carbohydrates: 29g, Protein: 42g

Snack: Cherimoya Bars

Week 3 Day 1

Breakfast

Apricot Almond Smoothie

¼ cup almonds

1 medium apricot, pitted

1 ½ cups milk of choice

2-3 ice cubes (optional)

Pinch each of cardamom & cinnamon

Place all ingredients in the blender and blend for 2-3 minutes until everything is very smooth.

Calories: 305, Fat: 12g, Carbohydrates: 30g, Protein:19g

Lunch

Beef & Brown Rice Bowl

¾ cup cooked brown rice

4 oz. beef, cut into small cubes

¼ cup ea: leeks and fennel

Pinch ea: sea salt, pepper, herb blend and garlic powder

1 tablespoon olive oil

Sauté the vegetables and beef in the olive oil with the seasonings, until the beef is browned and cooked through about 6-8 minutes. Serve with the rice.

Calories: 867, Fat: 25g, Carbohydrates: 111, Protein: 45

Dinner

Mackerel with Greens

1 6oz fillet Mackerel

1 teaspoon olive oil

Pinch ea paprika, garlic powder and cayenne

Lemon wedges

Preheat the oven to 350. Drizzle the mackerel with the olive oil and season with the seasonings, bake in the oven for 15-18 minutes until the fillet is lightly golden and has an internal temperature of 145 degrees. Serve with lemon wedges.

2 cups collard greens

¼ cup ea leeks and celery

Pinch ea of cayenne and garlic powder

1 tablespoon coconut oil

Heat coconut oil in a large skillet add collards, leeks celery and seasonings. Sauté until greens are wilted and vegetables are soft.

Calories: 618, Fat: 44g, Carbohydrates: 12g, Protein: 44g

Snack

Granola

½ cup oats

1/4 cup mixed nuts & seeds

2 tablespoons grass fed butter

1 tablespoon honey

½ teaspoon cinnamon

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Melt the butter, honey, sea salt and cinnamon together, pour over the oats and nuts/seeds. Stir well and transfer to a baking sheet. Bake in the oven for 20-25 minutes until the oats and nuts are toasted and lightly golden brown.

Serving Size ¼ cup

Calories: 119, Fat: 9g, Carbohydrates: 9g, Protein: 3g

Day 2 

Breakfast

Potato & Egg Skillet

½ cup cooked diced potatoes

2 tablespoons sliced leeks

3 eggs, beaten

1 tablespoon coconut oil

Pinch ea: pepper, cayenne, herb blend and garlic powder

Sauté the potatoes and leeks in the oil over medium heat, until the potatoes are lightly browned add seasonings and eggs. Cook until the eggs are set about 3-4 minutes. 

Calories: 380, Fat: 26g, Carbohydrates: 18g, Protein: 18g

Lunch

Kale & Chicken Salad

4 oz. cooked chicken

2 cups baby kale

¼ cup fennel, thinly sliced

Drizzle of olive oil & apple cider vinegar

2 teaspoons sunflower seeds

Toss all ingredients in a bowl.

Calories: 294, fat: 12g, Carbohydrates: 11, Protein: 36g

Dinner

Pinto Beans with Kale & Leeks

1 cup cooked pinto beans

½ cup leeks, sliced

1 cup kale, chopped

1 tablespoon olive oil

½ cup water or stock

Pinch ea: herb blend, cayenne and garlic powder

Sauté leeks and kale in the olive oil with the seasonings, until tender. Add the beans and stock, bring to a simmer and cook for 8-10 minutes.

Calories: 850, fat: 16g, Carbohydrates: 134g, Protein: 44g

Snack

Beef Jerky

6 oz. thinly sliced beef

Pinch ea: pepper, cayenne & garlic powder.

Dehydrate in a food dehydrator according to manufacturer’s directions or in a 200-degree oven for 6-8 hours.

Calories: 355, Fat: 10g, Carbohydrates: 0g, Protein: 51g

Day 3 

Breakfast

Scrambled Eggs & Toast

2 slices of whole grain bread

1 tablespoon butter

3 eggs

½ tablespoon olive oil

Toast the bread and butter. Scramble the eggs in the olive oil. 

Lunch 

Cream of Broccoli Soup

1/4 cup ea: leeks, celery and carrot, diced

2 cups broccoli florets

3 cups water or stock

1 tablespoon olive oil

¼ cup low fat cream

Pinch ea: cayenne and garlic powder

Sauté the leeks, carrot and celery in the olive oil, until soft and lightly golden. Add the stock, broccoli and seasonings, bring to a simmer. Cover, reduce heat and cook until the broccoli is tender. Blend with the cream.

Calories: 238, Fat: 18g, Carbohydrates: 17, Protein: 6g

Dinner

Apricot Sweet and Sour Chicken

6 oz. chicken chopped into 1 inch pieces

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 tablespoons apple cider vinegar

1 apricot, chopped

1 tablespoon honey

Pinch ea: pepper, cinnamon, garlic powder, red pepper flakes

Pulse the apricot, apple cider vinegar, maple syrup and seasonings in a food processor. Sauté the chicken in the olive oil, until browned, add the apricot sauce, and cook until the sauce is reduced by half. Serve with 1 ½ cups of steamed broccoli.

Calories: 468, Fat: 20g, Carbohydrates: 17g, Protein: 55g

Snack

Sardines

1 can of sardines, drained

Juice of a half a lemon

Drizzle lemon juice over the sardines and enjoy.

Calories: 191, Fat: 10g, Carbohydrates: 0g, Protein: 23g

Day 4 

Breakfast

Pear & Raspberry Breakfast Bars

1.5 cups oats

1/2 cup walnuts, chopped

¼ cup sunflower seeds

1 teaspoon cinnamon 

1 cup pear seeded and diced

½ cup raspberries

1 cup low fat milk

1 egg

1 teaspoon vanilla

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Lightly oil a 9×9 baking pan. Combine the oats, almonds, sunflower seeds and seasonings, add the fruits, milk, egg and vanilla, mix well. Place the batter into the pan and bake for 35 minutes. Allow to cool and cut into 9 bars.

Serving size 1 bar.

Calories: 113, Fat: 5g, Carbohydrates: 14g, Protein: 5g

 Lunch

Beef Burrito

1 whole wheat tortilla

3/4 cup cooked beef

1 cup kale

¼ cup leeks

1 tablespoon olive oil

Pinch ea: cumin, cayenne, oregano & chili powder

2 tablespoons plain Greek yogurt

Cook the kale and leeks in the olive oil, add the beef and spices. Toast the tortilla in a pan or in the oven. Wrap the beef mixture in the tortilla. Garnish with Greek yogurt.

Calories: 509, Fat: 22g, Carbohydrates: 34g, Protein: 42g

Dinner

Pistachio Crusted Flounder

1 6oz fillet of flounder

1 egg white

¼ cup of pistachio nuts, chopped

Preheat the oven to 350, beat the egg white until it is fluffy, add the macadamia nuts. Season the flounder with the and top with the egg white and pistachio nut mixture. Bake the fish in the oven for 15 -20 minutes until the internal temperature is 145 degrees.

Calories: 503, Fat: 28g, Carbohydrates: 14g, Protein: 51g

Snack

Orange & 1 Tablespoon Almond Butter

Calories: 296, Fat: 18g, Carbohydrates: 27g, Protein: 9g

Day 5

Breakfast

Almond Kale Smoothie

¼ cup almonds

1 cup kale

1 ½ cups milk of choice

2-3 ice cubes (optional)

Pinch of cardamom

Place all ingredients in the blender and blend for 2-3 minutes until everything is very smooth.

Calories: 305, Fat: 12g, Carbohydrates: 30g, Protein:19g

Lunch

Grilled Chicken & Apple Sandwich

2 slices of whole grain bread

1-2 tablespoons butter

4 oz. thinly sliced chicken breast

1/ 2 thinly sliced apple

1 tablespoon sliced onion

1 tablespoon whole grain mustard

Butter the outside of the bread and layer the mustard, onion, apple and chicken in the bread. Cook in a sandwich press or in a skillet, until both sides are golden brown.

Calories: 432, Fat: 18g, Carbohydrates: 27g, Protein: 43g

 Dinner

Lamb Kebabs with Mashed Turnips

6 oz. lamb, cut into 1 inch cubes

½ tablespoon olive oil

¼ teaspoon garlic powder

½ teaspoon rosemary

Preheat the grill. Toss the lamb in the oil with the seasonings and thread onto 2 skewers. Grill the lamb until it is browned and an internal temperature of 165 degrees.

11/2 cups turnips, chopped into 1 inch pieces

1 tablespoon coconut oil

Place the turnips in a pot and cover with water. Bring to a boil and cook until the turnips are soft. Drain (reserve a little bit of water). Mash the turnips with the coconut oil, adding the water as needed. 

Calories: 494, Fat: 33g, Carbohydrates: 0g, Protein: 47 g

Snack

Bean Dip

1/2 cup of cooked pinto or kidney beans

1 tablespoon olive oil

¼ cup each: leeks, carrot and celery

Pinch ea of cayenne, cumin, garlic powder and chili powder

Sauté the vegetables in the olive oil, until they are soft and golden, add the beans and cook until hot. Mash with a fork or pulse in the food processor. Eat with broccoli, celery or carrot.

Calories: 151, Fat: 5g, Carbohydrates: 20g, Protein: 7g

Day 6 

Breakfast

Oatmeal with Flax

2/3 cup of oats

1 tablespoon ground flax seed

1 ½ cups of water

½ teaspoon cinnamon

¼ cup blueberries

2 tablespoons chopped almonds

Cook oats, flax, sea salt and cinnamon in the water over medium heat, for 10 minutes. Serve with blueberries and almonds.

Calories: 786, Fat: 44g, Carbohydrates: 78g, Protein: 30g

Lunch

Roasted Root Vegetables & Chicken

6 oz. chicken, cut into 1 inch pieces

2 cups mixed root vegetables: carrot, sweet potatoes, rutabagas, turnips chopped into 1 inch pieces.

1 tablespoon olive oil

Pinch ea: pepper, rosemary and garlic powder

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Toss the chicken and vegetables in the oil with the seasonings. Roast in the oven for 25-30 minutes. 

Calories: 510, Fat: 19g, Carbohydrates: 31g, Protein: 51g

Dinner

Turkey Burgers with Sweet Potatoes

6 oz. ground turkey

Pinch ea: pepper, herb blend and garlic powder.

Preheat the grill. Mix the meat with the seasoning and grill until browned and the internal temperature is 165 degrees. 

1 cup sweet potatoes, sliced thinly

1 tablespoon coconut oil

Sauté the sweet potatoes in the coconut oil until they are golden and cooked through.

Calories: 449, fat: 32g, Carbohydrates: 0, protein: 46g

Snack

Herb Nut Dip

¼ cup cashews, soaked overnight & drained

½ teaspoon herb blend

Pinch ea: pepper and garlic powder.

Blend all ingredients in the food processor until smooth, add a spoonful of water if needed to make a dip consistency. Eat with ½ cup carrot or celery sticks.

Calories: 197, Fat: 15g, Carbohydrates: 11g, protein: 5g

Day 7

Breakfast

Kale Omelet

¼ cup leeks. chopped

½ cup kale, chopped

1 tablespoon olive oil

½ teaspoon herb seasoning

4 eggs

Sauté the leeks, kale and seasonings in half of the olive oil, until they are tender, remove from the pan and set aside. Beat the eggs and add the remaining olive oil back to the pan and pour the eggs in. Allow the eggs to set and lightly stir, once the bottom is set, flip the omelet over to cook it through. Place the omelet on a plate and add the filling, and fold the omelet over.

Calories: 388, Fat: 31g, Carbohydrates: 5g, Protein: 23g

Lunch

Spinach & Pear Salad with Salmon

1 can salmon, drained

1 pear, peeled and thinly sliced

2 cups spinach

Drizzle Olive oil & apple cider vinegar

Combine all ingredients in a large bowl and toss well and season to taste.

Calories: 310, Fat: 7g, Carbohydrates: 30g, Protein: 27g

Dinner

Herbed Baked Chicken with Beans

6 oz. chicken breast, cut into 1 inch pieces

½ cup cooked kidney beans

½ cup ea: leeks, kale

½ cup water or stock

1 teaspoon herb blend

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Place all ingredients in a small baking dish and bake in the oven, covered for 15 minutes, remove cover and bake for 10 minutes to reduce sauce and until chicken is lightly golden brown.

Calories: 633, Fat: 7g, Carbohydrates: 66g, Protein: 77

Snack

Turkey Meatballs

6 oz. ground turkey

 to taste

1 teaspoon herb blend

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and line a baking sheet with baking paper. Mix turkey with seasonings and shape into small meatballs. Bake in the oven for 20 minutes, until the turkey reaches an internal temperature of 165 degrees. Allow to cool.

Calories: 333, Fat: 18g, Carbohydrates: 0g, Protein: 46g

Week 4  Day 1 

Breakfast

Egg & Sausage Breakfast Wrap

3 eggs

3 oz turkey sausage

2 teaspoons olive oil

1 whole wheat tortilla

Saute the sausage until it is browned add the eggs and seasonings. Cook until the eggs are set. While the eggs are cooking, toast the tortilla in a pan or in the oven. When the eggs are cooked, place the eggs and sausage in the tortilla, and fold up.

Calories: 493, Fat: 29g, Carbohydrates: 23g, Protein: 37g

Lunch

Spilt Pea Soup

¼ cup each: sliced onions, diced celery & carrot

½ cup split peas

1 tablespoon olive oil

¾ teaspoon marjoram

Pinch of cayenne

In a small soup pot, cook the vegetables and seasonings in the olive oil, for 5-6 minutes, add the split peas and water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, cover and simmer for 25 minutes. 

Calories: 402, Fat: 5g, Carbohydrates: 60g, Protein: 27g

Dinner

Roasted Herb Chicken with Greens

1 6oz Chicken Breast

1 teaspoon olive oil

Pinch ea paprika, garlic powder and herb blend.

Preheat the oven to 350. Drizzle the chicken with the olive oil and season with the seasonings, bake in the oven for 15-18 minutes until the chicken is lightly golden and has an internal temperature of 165 degrees. 

2 cups beet or kale greens

¼ cup ea leeks and celery

Pinch ea of cayenne and garlic powder

1 tablespoon coconut oil

Heat coconut oil in a large skillet add collards, leeks celery and seasonings. Sauté until greens are wilted and vegetables are soft.

Calories: 618, Fat: 44g, Carbohydrates: 12g, Protein:

Snack

Turkey Meatballs

6 oz ground turkey

 to taste

1 teaspoon herb blend

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and line a baking sheet with baking paper. Mix turkey with seasonings and shape into small meatballs. Bake in the oven for 20 minutes, until the turkey reaches an internal temperature of 165 degrees. Allow to cool

Calories: 333, Fat: 18g, Carbohydrates: 0g, Protein: 46g

Day 2

Breakfast

Blueberry Muffins

½ cup ea amaranth, buckwheat and whole wheat flour.

1 teaspoon baking powder

½ teaspoon baking soda

½ teaspoon cinnamon

1 egg, beaten

2 tablespoons honey or maple syrup

¾ cup low fat milk 

2 tablespoons oil

1 cup blueberries

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees, line 6 muffin tins. Sift together the flours, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, then add the egg, honey, milk and oil, mix to make a smooth batter, add fruit. Divide batter evenly into the muffin tins and bake for 20-25 minutes.

Serving Size 2 Calories: 496, Fat: 15g, Carbohydrates: 79g, Protein: 15g

Lunch

Citrus Salmon Salad with Spinach

1 grapefruit, chopped

1 orange, chopped

½ cup pomegranate seeds

Combine all fruits together

¾ cup canned salmon, drained

2 cups spinach

Drizzle of Olive oil and white wine vinegar

Combine all ingredients in a large bowl and toss well and season to taste.

Calories: 310, Fat: 7g, Carbohydrates: 30g, Protein: 27g

Dinner

Pinto Beans with Kale & Leeks

1 cup cooked pinto beans

½ cup leeks, sliced

1 cup kale, chopped

1 tablespoon olive oil

½ cup water or stock

Pinch ea: herb blend, cayenne and garlic powder

Sauté leeks and kale in the olive oil with the seasonings, until tender. Add the beans and stock, bring to a simmer and cook for 8-10 minutes.

Calories: 850, fat: 16g, Carbohydrates: 134g, Protein: 44g

Snack

Herb Nut Dip

¼ cup cashews, soaked overnight & drained

½ teaspoon herb blend

Pinch ea: pepper and garlic powder.

Blend all ingredients in the food processor until smooth, add a spoonful of water if needed to make a dip consistency. Eat with ½ cup fennel or celery.

Calories: 197, Fat: 15g, Carbohydrates: 11g, protein: 5g

Day 3

Breakfast

Citrus Salad with Turkey Sausage

1 grapefruit, chopped

1 orange, chopped

1/2 cup raspberries

Combine all fruits together.

6 oz. ground turkey

Pinch ea: salt, pepper, cayenne, paprika, garlic powder and sage

Mix meat and seasonings together very well, and shape meat into 3 patties. Saute the patties in a non-stick pan for 3-4 minutes on each side, until the meat is cooked through.

Calories: 459, Fat: 19g, Carbohydrates: 32g, Protein: 49g

Lunch

Lamb & Barley Bowl

3/4 cup cooked Barley, drained

¾ cubed lamb

¼ cup each: leeks, kale and carrot

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 teaspoon herb blend

2 tablespoons chopped almonds

Saute the lamb and vegetables in the olive oil with the seasoning for 6-8 minutes, until the lamb is cooked through and browned. Place the barley in a bowl and add the lamb and vegetables, garnish with the almonds.

Calories: 705, Fat: 27g, Carbohydrates: 75g, Protein: 23g

Dinner

Grilled Mackerel with Brussel Sprouts

1 6oz fillet Mackerel

1 teaspoon olive oil

Pinch ea paprika, garlic powder and cayenne

Lemon wedges

Preheat the oven to 350. Drizzle the mackerel with the olive oil and season with the seasonings, bake in the oven for 15-18 minutes until the fillet is lightly golden and has an internal temperature of 145 degrees. Serve with lemon wedges.

1 ½ cups Brussel sprouts, halved

1 tablespoon coconut oil, melted

Toss the Brussel sprouts in the coconut oil season with  and roast in the oven for 20-25 minutes.

Calories: 618, Fat: 44g, Carbohydrates: 12g, Protein: 44g

Snack

Orange & 1 Tablespoon Almond Butter

Calories: 200, Fat: 12g, Carbohydrates: 46g, Protein:64g

Day 4 

Breakfast

Whole Grain French Toast

2 slices of whole grain bread

3 eggs

2 teaspoons coconut oil

Pinch ea: cinnamon and ginger

Garnish ½ cup Greek yogurt & ½ cup blueberries

Beat the eggs with the seasonings and soak the bread until it absorbs all the eggs. Heat the coconut oil in a large pan and cook the French toast for 4-5 minutes on each side, until it is golden brown. Garnish with yogurt and blueberries.

Calories: 438, Fat: 24g, Carbohydrates: 36g, Protein: 23g

Lunch

Lentil Burger

1 cup cooked lentils, drained

½ cup kale, chopped

¼ cup leeks, sliced

2 tablespoons walnuts, diced

Pinch each: pepper, cayenne, thyme, oregano

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and line a baking pan with baking paper. Combine all ingredients together in a bowl and mix well, form into 2 patties. Bake patties in the oven for 25 minutes. Serve on a bed of spinach.

Serves 2 Calories: 402, Fat: 5g, Carbohydrates: 60g, Protein: 27g

Dinner

Chicken Pasta

1 cup whole grain pasta

1 cup broccoli

Cook pasta according to directions on the package and add the broccoli halfway through. 

6oz chicken breast, cut into 1 inch pieces

1 teaspoon olive oil

Pinch ea paprika, garlic powder and cayenne

Preheat the oven to 350. Drizzle the chicken with the olive oil and season with the seasonings, bake in the oven for 15-18 minutes until the chicken is lightly golden and has an internal temperature of 165 degrees. 

Calories: 550, Fat: 12g, Carbohydrates: 46g, Protein: 64g

Snack

Devilled Eggs

2 boiled eggs, cooled

1 tablespoon mayonnaise

½ teaspoon apple cider vinegar

Pinch ea: cayenne, paprika, garlic powder, 

Cut eggs in half, and scoop out the yolks. Mash the yolks with the mayonnaise, apple cider vinegar and seasonings, then place mashed seasoned yolk back into the 4 halves.

Calories: 183, Fat: 14g, Carbohydrates: 4g, Protein: 11g

Day 5 

Breakfast

Blueberry Chia Smoothie

1 cup blueberries, frozen

1 cup yogurt

1 tablespoon chia seeds

Pinch of ginger

Place all ingredients in the blender and blend for 3-4 minutes, until smooth.

Calories: 413, Fat: 13g, Carbohydrates: 48g, Protein: 21g


Lunch

Chicken, Fennel & Citrus Salad

1 orange, chopped

½ lime or lemon, chopped

Combine all fruits together

1 cup cooked chopped chicken

½ cup sliced fennel

2 cups spinach

Drizzle each of Olive oil and white wine vinegar

Combine all ingredients in a large bowl and toss well and season to taste.

Calories: 310, Fat: 7g, Carbohydrates: 30g, Protein: 27g

Dinner

Lamb Kebabs with Mashed Turnips

6 oz. lamb, cut into 1 inch cubes

½ tablespoon olive oil

¼ teaspoon garlic powder

½ teaspoon rosemary

Preheat the grill. Toss the lamb in the oil with the seasonings and thread onto 2 skewers. Grill the lamb until it is browned and an internal temperature of 165 degrees.

11/2 cups turnips, chopped into 1 inch pieces

1 tablespoon coconut oil

Place the turnips in a pot and cover with water. Bring to a boil and cook until the turnips are soft. Drain (reserve a little bit of water). Mash the turnips with the coconut oil, adding the water as needed. 

Calories: 494, Fat: 33g, Carbohydrates: 0g, Protein: 47 g

Snack

Kale Chips

2 cups kale

1 tablespoon olive oil

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees. Toss the kale with the olive oil and mix well. Lay the kale on a baking sheet and bake in the oven for 10-12 minutes until the kale is crispy and lightly browned. Allow to cool.

Calories: 149, Fat: 14g, Carbohydrates: 14g, Protein: 4g

Day 6

Breakfast

Granola w/Yogurt

½ cup oats

1/4 cup mixed nuts & seeds

2 tablespoons grass fed butter

1 tablespoon honey

½ teaspoon cinnamon

¾ cup Greek Yogurt

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Melt the butter, honey, sea salt and cinnamon together, pour over the oats and nuts/seeds. Stir well and transfer to a baking sheet. Bake in the oven for 20-25 minutes until the oats and nuts are toasted and lightly golden brown.

Serving Size ¼ cup

Calories: 119, Fat: 9g, Carbohydrates: 9g, Protein: 3g

Lunch

Chicken Wrap

1 whole wheat wrap

1 cup canned chicken, drained

1 cup spinach

½ cup thinly sliced fennel

Juice of half a lemon or lime

½ teaspoon oregano

Layer the chicken, spinach, fennel and seasonings in the center of the wrap, add fresh juice, wrap everything up.

Calories: 285, Fat: 14g, Carbohydrates: 8g, Protein: 26g

Dinner

Salmon with Mashed Beets

1 6oz Salmon fillet

1 teaspoon olive oil

Pinch ea paprika, garlic powder and cayenne

Lemon wedges

Preheat the oven to 350. Drizzle the mackerel with the olive oil and season with the seasonings, bake in the oven for 15-18 minutes until the fillet is lightly golden and has an internal temperature of 145 degrees. Serve with lemon wedges.

11/2 cups beets, chopped into 1 inch pieces

1 tablespoon coconut oil

Place the beets in a pot and cover with water. Bring to a boil and cook until soft. Drain (reserve a little bit of water). Mash the beets with the coconut oil, adding the water as needed. 

Calories: 618, Fat: 44g, Carbohydrates: 12g, Protein: 44g


Snack

Roasted Nut & Seed Mix

1/4 cup mixed nuts & seeds

1/8 teaspoon seasoning; curry, chili or cinnamon

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Toss the nuts/seeds with the seasonings. Stir well and transfer to a baking sheet. Bake in the oven for 15 minutes until the nuts are toasted and lightly golden brown.

Calories: 137, Fat: 12g, Carbohydrates: 5g, Protein:5g

Day 7

Breakfast

Egg & Sprout Tortilla Wrap

3 eggs

2 teaspoons olive oil

½ cups fresh sprouts

1 whole wheat tortilla

Season the eggs and scramble them in the olive oil. While the eggs are cooking, toast the tortilla in a pan or in the oven. When the eggs are cooked, layer the eggs and sprouts in the tortilla.

Calories: 409, Fat: 24g, Carbohydrates: 29g, Protein: 24g

Lunch

Curried Squash Soup

¼ cup each: sliced leeks, diced celery and carrot

1 tablespoon olive oil

¾ teaspoon curry powder

1 ½ cups of butternut squash, peeled and cubed

2 cups of water or stock

Saute the vegetables and spices in the olive oil in a soup pot, until the vegetables are soft. Add the squash and water, bring to a boil. Reduce the heat, cover and simmer for 25-30 minutes, until the squash is soft.

Calories: 295, Fat: 7g, Carbohydrates: 56g, Protein: 12g

Dinner

Beef Roasted with Carrot & Leeks

6 oz. beef, cut into 1 inch pieces

2 cups mixed root vegetables: carrot, leeks, sweet potatoes & turnips chopped into 1 inch pieces.

1 tablespoon olive oil

Pinch ea: sea salt, pepper, rosemary and garlic powder

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Toss the beef and vegetables in the oil with the seasonings. Roast in the oven for 25-30 minutes. 

Calories: 565, Fat: 19g, Carbohydrates: 31g, Protein: 61g

Snack

Apricot Cherry Bars

1.5 cups oats

1/2 cup walnuts, chopped

¼ cup sunflower seeds

1 teaspoon each cinnamon and sea salt

1 cup apricot, diced

½ cup cherries, chopped

1 cup low fat milk

1 egg

1 teaspoon vanilla

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Lightly oil a 9×9 baking pan. Combine the oats, almonds, sunflower seeds and seasonings, add the fruits, milk, egg and vanilla, mix well. Place the batter into the pan and bake for 35 minutes. Allow to cool and cut into 9 bars.

Calories: 113, Fat: 5g, Carbohydrates: 14g, Protein: 5g

Movers and Shakers – Exercise Plan 

Cardio

For the next 4 weeks you’ll work to improve and increase your cardio work outs. There are many different types of cardio workouts you can do depending on your interests and fitness levels:

Walking

Jogging/Running

Bicycling

Swimming

Your cardio workouts should be fun and should be something you enjoy doing. Whether you train inside on a machine like a treadmill or go outside doesn’t matter. 

What is important to remember is what you need to accomplish with your cardio workout, increasing your heart rate. 

Initially you need to increase your heart rate to between 60-70% of your maximum heart rate and keep it there for the majority of your workout to burn fat. 

You can also keep your heart rate between 80-85% of your maximum heart rate to become a stronger more efficient cardio athlete. 

If you are doing cardio workouts and your heart rate isn’t elevated, you are not getting the maximum benefit of your workout. 

If you can’t keep your heart rate in the right zone you won’t burn fat. Depending on your current fitness level it may take you awhile to build the endurance to get your heart rate up and keep it where it needs to be during your cardio workouts. 

Don’t feel frustrated, as each workout you do takes you closer to your goals and to improving your fitness and endurance.


What’s My Maximum Heart Rate?

There is a simple formula for figuring out your maximum heart rate, it’s 220 minus your age. 

While this simple formula doesn’t take into account your current weight, fitness or ability it is a good way to help you figure out how to pace and track your cardio workouts.

Why it’s Important to Use 60% to 70% of Maximum Heart Rate

60% to 70% of Maximum Heart Rate is the cardio fat burning zone, because most of the calories burned in this zone are taken from the body’s fats. deconditioned exercisers. 

You will want to exercise in this zone until you can complete a thirty-minute cardio workout.

Why it’s Important to use 80% to 85% of Maximum Heart Rate

Don’t attempt to exercise in this zone until you exercise in the 60% to 70% rate for 30 minutes or more. 

When you begin to do cardio workouts in the 80% to 85% rate add them slowly, for example increase your rate for 30 seconds, the go back to the 60% to 70% rate for 1-2 minutes than go again for 30 seconds. Overtime you’ll be able to increase your time in the higher rate for 45 seconds 1 minute etc… 

Exercise in the 80% to 85% zone will have you breathing hard and will build your endurance, making exercise in the fat burning mode easier and more effective.

The easiest way to monitor your heart rate is with a heart rate monitor that will let you know what zone your heart rate is in. 

If you don’t have one you can easily check your pulse during your workout. But don’t stop too long to take your heart rate.

Core Workout

Core workouts will help you build lean muscle in your core and give you a flat stomach, while helping you burn belly fat. 

The basic core workout is a fat blasting workout that is great for beginners and experienced folks too. Core workouts, work more than just your abs, core workouts include exercises that strengthen and tone your shoulders, back and hips. 

When you first start the workout you can do fewer reps or modified exercises but overtime you’ll gain strength and be able to increase the reps to continue to burn fat and get a flat or even ripped stomach. 

Basic Crunches

For the basic crunch you’ll begin by laying on your back with your legs bent and have your feet under your knees while squeezing the ball between your knees.

 You will look straight up at the ceiling with your hands behind your head. Inhale as you bring your body up and exhale as you bring your body down, repeat the crunch as many times as you can, up to 25.

Side Crunch

For the side crunch you’ll begin in the same position as the basic crunch except you’ll keep one hand behind your head and extend your other arm out placing your palm on the floor, and then crunch up bringing your elbow towards your opposite knee, as you do this keep your neck straight and keep your opposite shoulder on the floor. 

Repeat the crunch as many times as you can, up to 25 on each side.

In and Outs

For the in and outs you’ll sit on the floor with your hands behind you on the floor for support, look straight ahead and lift your chest, keep the ball between your knees and about 8-10 inches off the floor, keep your stomach squeezed in. 

Inhale as you draw your knees in towards your chest and exhale as you extend your legs back to the starting position. Repeat up to 25 times.

Kicks

Lay on your back on the floor and look straight up at the ceiling, keeps your arms extended alongside your body with your palms facing down, lift both legs 6-8 inches off of the floor and kick your legs up and down, repeat for up to 25 reps.

Plank 

Plank is the classic push-up position on either your hands and feet or your hands and knees, place the ball between your knees and squeeze lightly to keep it in place. You’ll want to practice holding plank for as long as you and working up to 1 minute for 5 reps.

Side Plank

For side plank you start by sitting on the floor and placing your hand on the floor beneath your shoulder, shift your weight into your hand and lift yourself off the floor, as you extend your legs and stack your feet, lifting your hips up so your body is in one line. Practice holding side plank for up to 45 seconds for 3 reps.

Strength

Strength training exercises aid in weight loss by keeping your muscles lean. Your body burns more calories (and more fat) when you have more lean muscle mass. 

When you train for strength you focus on lifting heavy weight and low reps. For the next 4 weeks, you will strength train, 2 to 3 times per week. Having days off from strength training allows time for adequate rest and recovery so your body will become leaner, stronger and fitter. 

Strength training speeds up your metabolism, which is why it is so important to fat loss in addition to all the lean muscles you get. 

For your strength training sessions, you will need barbells, a weight bar and a weight bench to do bench presses. 

Remember to have a spotter anytime you are lifting heavy weights.  For the next 4 weeks you will focus on 4 lifts:

Dumbell Row

Squat

Push Press

Bench Press 

DeadLift

I’ve broken the strength workouts into, to 2 strength training workouts and you’ll want to alternate Strength 1, and Strength 2

Strength 1

Deadlift

Push Press

Squat

Strength 2

Dumbell Row 

Bench Press

Squat

When you first start, do these exercises with the bar or barbell and then with a little weight so your body learns the movement and warm up. 

If you are new to strength training, it may take you awhile to figure out how much weight you can lift, you may also be surprised by how much weight you can lift and how quickly you make gains. 

Your goal is to complete 4-6 reps at the maximum weight you can lift.

How to Do the Strength Exercises

Dumbell Row

With a dumbbell in each hand, begin standing with your feet hip width apart and your knees slightly bent, bend at the waist until your upper body is parallel to the floor, keep your stomach squeezed in and your back straight and your head up.

Your arms should be engaged and hang straight down, exhale as you pull your arms up bending your elbows and keeping them close to your body, until your hands are close to your chest, hold for 2-3 seconds then exhale and extend your arms back to straight. Repeat 4-6 times.

Squat

Lift up your barbell over your head and lower it into position on top of your shoulders with your elbows bent, lift your chest up and look straight ahead, with your feet wider than shoulder width apart, inhale and squat down, until your thighs are parallel to the floor, exhale as you stand up. Repeat 4-6 times.

Push Press

Stand with your feet under your hips and grip your barbell wider than shoulder width. 

Begin with the barbell in rack position: on your chest below the collar bone with the palms facing outwards and the elbows bent in beside the body. As you inhale, bend your knees slightly on the exhale straighten the knees and pop the hips as you lift the barbell over your head, straightening your arms. 

Repeat 4-6 times.

Bench Press 

To begin with the bench press, start by laying on the bench with your barbell racked. 

Grip the barbell wider than shoulder width apart and lift the barbell out of the rack, inhale bend your elbows and lower the weight onto your chest, as you exhale straighten your arms. Repeat 4-6 times.

Dead Lift

To begin the deadlift place the barbell in front of you, stand with your feet wider than hip width apart with your toes pointed out slightly, keeping your stomach squeezed in and your back straight. 

Bend at the hips and knees, inhale as you grip the barbell with straight arms and then exhale to stand up. Repeat 4-6 times.